The Admiral Lake Loop Trail

The Admiral Lake Loop Trail originates at 1.7 km along the Musquodoboit Trailway as measured from Park Road.  The trail climbs into an open area of blueberry bushes and low saplings, reminders of the 1973 forest fires that swept through this area. On your left, a 600 m (return) trail spur leads to a local landmark, Skull Rock. The main Admiral Lake Loop continues to the right, leaving the burn area behind to climb steeply through mossy woods to another popular lookoff, Rolling Stone (named for the boulder perched precariously on its top).

 

From there and the nearby Harbour lookoff, hikers are afforded spectacular views of the forests, the Musquodoboit Harbour, Petpeswick inlet and coastal waters as far south as Lawrencetown. Descending from the Harbour lookoff, the loop trail passes through a talus cave where a large rock has fallen from a cliff leaving a natrual archway. Returning to the burn area, the path climbs gradually towards the Admiral Lake Lookoff. From here you can enjoy an 180° panorama over the Ship Harbour – Long Lake and White Lake wilderness areas, and island-studded Admiral Lake.

 

Below this high point, the trail returns to the mature woods, skirting Eunice Lake alongside a cliff, before winding its way to a lookoff, Jessie's Diner, which overlooks Bayer Lake and the Musquodoboit River. Next, you return to the Trailway below Jessie's Diner at 5.15 km (2.7 km from Park Road).

 

Distance: 5.15 km in addition to 340 m (one way) for the Skull Rock Spur

 

Minimum elevation is 10 m.

Maximum elevation is 100 m
 

Total Elevation Gain is 291 m with elevation loss of 300 m

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SNOWSHOING -  CYCLING -  HIKING -  PICNIC SPOTS -  OUTHOUSES -  CROSS COUNTRY SKIING

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Musquodoboit Trailways Association

Box 336
Musquodoboit Harbour, NS B0J 2L0

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Photo credit to Michael Deazley